United Nations Security Council

Following the end of World War II, the international community implemented the Article 24 to the United Nations Charter, through the establishment of a Security Council (UNSC) whose key purpose was the “maintenance of international peace and security” equipped with the appropriate means of enforcement.

United Nations Security Council

Following the end of World War II, the international community implemented the Article 24 to the United Nations Charter, through the establishment of a Security Council (UNSC) whose key purpose was the maintenance of international peace and securityequipped with the appropriate means of enforcement. This proved to be the most fundamental innovation since it consolidated the interests of World War IIs victors guaranteeing their future support of the UN. By keeping their interests intact, all underlying issues that led to the previous collapse of the League of Nations were resolved. These events ensured the establishment of the United Nations as a credible body for conflict resolution and encouraged different countries to join. 

The Security Council consists of fifteen members: The victors of World War II, namely China, France, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States (they are also known as the P5 and hold permanent seats in the council) as well as ten non-permanent members who rotate based on regional elections every two years. The P5 hold a veto right, which basically means that one novote from any of the 5 cancels the whole resolution. This is very important since the resolutions that come out of this particular council are binding, or in other words, can be implemented by force. 

The council has four primary functions: first of all, the council can call upon members to implement sanctions, including but not limited to, cutting diplomatic relations, applying embargo on arms, banning travels and implementing financial and economic penalties. Second, the council serves as a diplomatic medium to examine situations that might lead to aggressive international disputes. Third, the council might also take military actions by deploying peacekeeping troops. Finally, the council works on partnership with other United Nations bodies and even some Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs). Cooperation is extremely important regarding issues such as terrorism, nuclear proliferation, and the deployment of peacekeeping operations. 

In 2015, Iran agreed a long-term deal on its nuclear programme with a group of world powers known as the P5+1 – the US, UK, France, China, Russia and Germany.

It came after years of tension over Iran’s alleged efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. Iran insisted that its nuclear programme was entirely peaceful, but the international community did not believe that.

Under the accord, Iran agreed to limit its sensitive nuclear activities and allow in international inspectors in return for the lifting of crippling economic sanctions.

Agenda Item: Current Affairs of Iran and International Nuclear Deals With Their Threat on International Security

 

Under Secretary General: Yener Değirmenci
Academic Assistant: Mona Wali